Talk About a Scandal: Wine

Wine. It comes from grapes, or other fruits. It’s alcohol, and we love to tote its nutritional and health benefits. So why are there issues? My theory is that people love a controversy. I’ve taken the liberty of finding out wine’s dirty little secrets to share with all of you.

The soil that wine grapes grow in are more important than the grapes themselves. The difference between wine and rich, flavorful, potent wine is truly the soil it is grown in. This is before cellars, barrels, and even human influence on wine making. ‘Tis true that generating product is sometimes more important than quality control. Here is where the soil comes in: all wines are starting to taste the same. Why?

We’re all using the degraded soil on Earth to grow the grapes in. Not to mention global warming, which is directly related to the top two wine grape must-haves: Climate, and Soil. If the proper temperature is not present, the wine grape will suffer and potentially affect an entire season of crops.

There is relief: GIS, or geographical information systems, are used to pinpoint exactly where the best crops of wine grapes can be planted. The detailed scientific information GIS retrieves about the soil can make or break a winery. Naturally, the demand for viable land is turning into a requirement. Chateau St. Michelle, here in Washington, assures their wine livelihood through the use of this technology.
Growing wine grapes in the right soil is like floating in equilibrium. The grapes taste better, ripen more evenly, and become a hardier, healthier crop. Who doesn’t want grapes of steel in their bottle of wine?

We are all aware of the impact that chemical fertilizers and pesticides have on our bodies and the environment. Wineries do not shy away from the use of these toxic terrors. Why? To ensure that they have a product to make profit from. Devrinol, Karmex, Surflan, and RoundUp are just a few chemical pesticides that are commonly used on grape vineyards to preserve crop viability. Unfortunately, these chemicals have been found to appear in the foods we eat, causing question among wine drinkers everywhere. “Will I be affected by this?” The verdict is “no, not really.” The use of chemical pesticides in wine has decreased steadily and looks to be near or at zero by 2016.

It looks like the controversy with wine has been recognized and answered rapidly. Wine growers everywhere embrace the idea of organic farming because it directly affects wine quality and demand. The higher quality a wine is, the more likely brand loyalty will be established by the consumer.

If this kind of drive to better business practices isn’t convincing, what is?

If you’re secretly saddened by the lack of controversy in this post, I suggest you check out a detailed list of minor issues within the wine sector, such as “corks or screws?”

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