Simple and Quick 10-Minute Paleo Chocolate Sauce

I get a thrill when I cook.

For some people, they may call this thrill an “adrenaline rush;” a moment in time where all of your superhuman powers of culinary conception collide into an incredible attack that results into an explosion of awesome for your taste buds.

Lemon pepper and rosemary ham? Genius. Beefsteak tomato jalapeno grilled cheese? A-may-zing.

Truly, these people are born with a gift. If this sounds like you, embrace it!

Why?

I am not one of those people.

My chicken is either raw or stringy and dry. I always put too much corn starch into everything so every soup becomes a gravy.
For the dry chicken.

Needless to say, today’s post is exciting and a Kayleigh form of culinary genius.

Hand crafted, home made and a paleo-friendly chocolate sauce!

Even if you’re not paleo, I highly recommend you prepare this sauce.
This baby can be used with anything: ice creams, as a mix in for brownies and cookies, and for a mole recipe are my favorite ideas so far.

Well, let’s get on it! Here’s your recipe:

everyday chocolate sauce (refined sugar free, paleo, vegan)

1 cup filtered water
1/3 cup cacao (stabilizes blood sugar), cocoa, or carob (caffeine-free) powder
pinch of sea salt
cinnamon to taste (optional, i like it for blood sugar stabilizing properties)
dash/capful of vanilla bean extract (or use vanilla beans if you have them!)
1/2-3/4 cup maple syrup (i used 1/2 but my sweet tooth is not pronounced)
why i sweeten with maple syrup.

Begin by pouring water and cocoa powder into a pot, transfer to the stove on medium-high heat. Stir in until cocoa powder is well incorporated into the water, and you have chocolate water.
Warning: It will smell amazing, but tastes gross. I tried. You’re welcome.


Allow the water to begin boiling. Once the chocolate water begins to thicken up (you will know because it’s shiny and looks like gravy– oh wait, I know that one well) turn the stove on medium heat. Add in  salt, optional cinnamon, and vanilla. Stir briskly. Add in maple syrup slowly, and mix.
I found a small candy whisk worked great for this recipe. You can use a big whisk too, especially if you’re doubling this recipe.
Wait for the chocolate sauce to begin boiling again. After about 4 minutes, still on medium heat, your chocolate sauce should thicken again. If it’s not like gravy, don’t worry!
Take the sauce off the stove and let rest for 5-10 minutes. I taste tested my results to make sure I had enough sweetener. This would be a good time for you to do the same.
Pour the sauce into an old jam jar, glass container, or syrup bottle. Store in the refrigerator covered. Use when needed.

Regarding sweetener– Don’t shy away from using honey, agave, turbinado sugar, or another sweetener of your choice.
I’m sure liquid and even powdered stevia will work just fine in this recipe. 

Regarding flavor– I wanted so badly to try adding extracts to this recipe as a non-paleo treat like mint, hazelnut, or banana.

Let me know what modifications you try! 

I promptly made a cayenne mocha with this new-found cooking success and now I’m a happy camper. I hate Sundays, so this is a very good thing.
But that’s another blog post, for another day. A very unenthusiastic day.

Which day of the week do you dislike the most? What are your favorite uses of chocolate sauce?

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Simple and Quick 10-Minute Paleo Chocolate Sauce

Talk About a Scandal: Wine, Chocolate, Coffee.

Coffee, chocolate, and wine.

Three wonderful, beautiful, delicious food stuffs that humans are blessed to have available for overconsumption. Every morning, a freshly brewed up of espresso or drip coffee accompanied by a chocolate chip scone, and in the evening, a deep dark merlot with dinner, only to be finished with rich decadent chocolate cake.

Then you wake up and do it all over again!
Or is that just me? 

It’s not just a sensory love I share with these three beauties: an ethical love naturally follows it. Kind of like when a cat owner sees a stray cat running and wants to find out if it has an owner, I too, want to be sure my chocolate, wine, and coffee are treated fairly.

Come to find out, they’re not. Coffee is grown in deforested, environmentally toxic conditions with no chance to grow as it naturally had for hundreds of years.
Chocolate is no better. Children in the Ivory Coast are being trafficked into working long hours with no breaks and are often beaten if they don’t work “hard enough.”
Wine has had its own share of unsustainable woes, but now we are finding out that pesticide residue, chemical flavorings, and modern industrial demands destroying wine quality.

I will be covering each issue in depth over the course of this week, highlighting major problems and getting to the truth to figure out exactly what will bring the right kind of positive change to these injustices.

Or, at least, raise our awareness of them.

What do you know about the issues surrounding coffee, chocolate, and wine?

Talk About a Scandal: Wine, Chocolate, Coffee.

Cacao is the next big thing for genome sequencing.

The news is in, people. Chocolate, our friend and our frenemy, has become under close watch for something near and dear to its biologically-nonexistent heart. We have harvested, over-processed, and diluted the cacao plant. Now, we move on to greater and more technologically advanced things. We genome it.

For the record, I felt slightly disturbed after watching the multiple press videos about the team of Mars (hot-shot candy company), WSU (huh?), and IMB (really?). I even thought Why would these three come together?

For now, the only information we do have is that in response to our crop losses in cacao harvesting, this team “Cacao Genome Project” aims to create a cacao plant that will withstand harsh weather, “annoying little pests” (that I personally think are not annoying; or pests), and our growing global climate change. Hallelujah. It looks like we’ve finally figured it out. Cacao will be sustainable and great and lively.

^ SARCASM. ^

I feel extremely misled and (quite frankly) a little peeved that this is being toted as a solution to our problem. Whatever happened to replenishing the trees that nourish the plants so that they grow on their own time? Whatever happened to treating the world as a stable environment, and not a constantly growing one? I truly feel that scientifically modifying our world to continually feed our expanding appetites is never going to be sustainable or intelligent.

How do you feel about GMO crops, or genome sequencing?

Cacao is the next big thing for genome sequencing.